Dark Caracal Targets Thousands in Over 21 Countries. The Electronic Frontier Foundation and Lookout Security released a report detailing several active Dark Caracal #hacking campaigns that successfully targeted mobile devices of #military personnel, medical #professionals, #journalists, #activists, and others in over 21 countries.

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Dark Caracal: Hackers Spied on Targets in Over 21 Countries and Stole Hundreds of Gigabytes of Data

International Business Times UK | By India Ashok

A new and massive cyberespionage campaign, believed to be the work of Lebanese hackers linked to Lebanese General Security Directorate (GDGS) in Beirut, has been uncovered.

A new report by the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Lookout Security revealed that the cyberespionage group, dubbed Dark Caracal, has conducted numerous attacks against thousands of targets in over 21 countries in North America, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia.

The hacker group successfully targeted mobile devices of military personnel, medical professionals, journalists, lawyers, activists and more. It has stolen hundreds of gigabytes of data, including photos, text messages, call records, audio recordings, contact information and more.

The cyberespionage group stole this massive trove of information using its custom-developed mobile spyware called Pallas. The spyware, which Lookout discovered in 2017, is found in malware-laced Android apps — knock-offs of popular apps like WhatsApp, Telegram and others that users downloaded from third-party online stores.

“People in the US, Canada, Germany, Lebanon, and France have been hit by Dark Caracal,” EFF director of Cybersecurity Eva Galperin said in a statement. “This is a very large, global campaign, focused on mobile devices. Mobile is the future of spying, because phones are full of so much data about a person’s day-to-day life.”

According to the report, Dark Caracal has been active in several different campaigns, running parallel, with its backend infrastructure also having been used by other threat actors. For instance, Operation Manul, which according to the EFF targeted journalists, lawyers and dissidents of the Kazakhistan government, was launched using Dark Caracal’s infrastructure.

According to Galperin, the Dark Caracal group may be offering its spyware services to various clients, including governments, The Register reported.

Dark Caracal hackers also make use of other malware variants such as the Windows malware called Bandook RAT. The group also uses a previously unknown multi-platform malware dubbed CrossRAT by Lookout and EFF, which is capable of targeting Windows, Linux and OSX systems. The report states that the APT group also borrows or purchases hacking tools from other hackers on the dark web.

“Dark Caracal is part of a trend we’ve seen mounting over the past year whereby traditional APT actors are moving toward using mobile as a primary target platform,” said Mike Murray, VP of security intelligence at Lookout. “The Android threat we identified, as used by Dark Caracal, is one of the first globally active mobile APTs we have spoken publicly about.”

“One of the interesting things about this ongoing attack is that it doesn’t require a sophisticated or expensive exploit. Instead, all Dark Caracal needed was application permissions that users themselves granted when they downloaded the apps, not realizing that they contained malware,” said EFF staff technologist Cooper Quintin. “This research shows it’s not difficult to create a strategy allowing people and governments to spy on targets around the world.”

Ransomware Posing as Flash Player Download A new strain of ransomware hit organizations throughout Eastern Europe earlier this week. Spread through compromised websites, the Bad Rabbit ransomware poses as an Adobe Flash Player download, and after infecting one machine, can quickly spread through an organization’s network without being detected.

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The Latest Ransomware Presents Itself as an Adobe Flash Player Download

Nextgov | By Keith Collins |

A new strain of ransom ware, called Bad Rabbit, began hitting organizations throughout Russia and Eastern Europe on Wednesday (Oct. 25). The malware is being spread through compromised websites, presenting itself as an Adobe Flash Player download.

“When users visited one of the compromised websites, they were redirected to 1dnscontrol[.]com, the site which was hosting the malicious file,” according to a blog post by Talos, Cisco’s threat intelligence team.

Once infected with the ransom ware, victims are directed to a web page on the dark web, which demands they pay 0.05 bit coin (roughly $285 USD) to get their files back.

After one computer on a network is infected, Bad Rabbit can quickly and covertly spread through an organization without being detected. Although the ransom ware has been detected in several countries, it appears to be concentrated in organizations in Russia and Ukraine, particularly media outlets.

#SID2018 Is the Internet Safer? Today is the annual Safer Internet Day, an effort to promote safer and responsible use of the internet and mobile phones that is celebrated by over 120 countries. Several cyber experts and companies weigh in on the dangers that younger internet browsers face, and how government, industry, parents, and others in the community can help reduce usage risks.

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#SID2018: Is the Internet Safer?

Infosecurity Magazine | By Dan Raywood | February 6, 2018

Today is the annual Safer #InternetDay, where the reality of online threats are detailed in the effort to encourage users to take better safety steps online.

According to research released by the UK Safer Internet Centre, a study of 2000 eight- to 17-year-olds, found that 11% had “felt worried or anxious on the internet,” while respondents had felt inspired (74%), excited (82%) or happy (89%) as a result of their internet use in the previous week.

This year’s event is using the slogan “Create, Connect and Share Respect: A better internet starts with you” with a strong emphasis on using the internet and what makes users feel good or bad. In a time where more is being done to deliver a safe experience online – including free SSL certificates, the launch of a new version of the TLS protocol and the ability to filter out certain words on Twitter – it does seem that more is being done to provide a safer and better experience for all online.

Margot James, Minister for Digital and the Creative Industries, said that the internet does have a positive effect on young people’s lives, but we must all recognize the dangers that can be found online. “Only by working together can government, industry, parents, schools and communities harness the power of the internet for good and reduce its risks.”

At the recent White Hat Ball, it was revealed that in 2017, there were over 12,000 counselling sessions in which children spoke to Childline about experiences of online sexual abuse, bullying and safety.

Will Gardner, a director of the UK Safer Internet Centre and CEO of Childnet, said: “Safer Internet Day gives us the unique opportunity to collectively promote respect and empathy online, inspire young people to harness their enthusiasm and creativity, and support them to build positive online experiences for everyone. It is #inspirational to see so many different organizations and individuals come together today to build a better internet.”

After all, a #safer #internet means more young people are encouraged to learn more about the internet and its workings, and therefore see the benefits of a career in cybersecurity.

Raj Samani, chief scientist and fellow at McAfee, said the reality is that we need to continue raising awareness for codes of best practice online. “Cyber-criminals are constantly on the lookout for slip ups and mistakes which allow them to access lucrative private data – from bank account details to medical history: consumers must be aware of the threats online – not least because the blurring of work life boundaries today means bad habits online can quickly slip into the office.”

As a result, Samani recommended that businesses should offer staff training to build up a strong security culture across their entire organization.

He added: “Implementing the right technology is vital but, at the end of the day, it’s about looking for a blended approach which suits your specific organization. This means finding the right combination of people, process and technology to effectively protect the organization’s data, detect any threats and, when targeted, rapidly correct systems.

“Safer Internet Day acts as a timely reminder for organizations to ensure the correct training is in place so staff can remain cyber-savvy online.”

To tie-in with the day, ENISA published the Cybersecurity Culture in Organizations report, in order to promote both the understanding and uptake of cybersecurity culture programs within organizations. ENISA said that a decent culture is achieved by:

• Setting #cybersecurity as a standing agenda item at board meetings to underline the importance of a robust cybersecurity culture

• Ensure that employees are consulted and their concerns regarding cybersecurity practices are being considered by the cybersecurity culture working group

• Ensure that business processes/strategies and cybersecurity processes/strategies are fully aligned

“While many organizations and employees are familiar with related concepts such as cybersecurity awareness and information security frameworks, cybersecurity culture covers a broader scope. The idea behind this concept is to make information security considerations an integral part of an employee’s daily life,” ENISA’s announcement said.

Part of this was to appreciate that “cyber threat awareness campaigns alone do not provide sufficient #protection against ever evolving cyber-attacks,” and that technical cybersecurity measures need to be in accordance with other business processes, and it is important that employees need to act as a strong human firewall against cyber-attacks.

A safer internet is better for all, although a cynic of such awareness days would suggest that there should be year-round awareness of the issues and part of developing a culture is the constant awareness. Regardless, some action is better than none and it is reassuring to see such positivity about internet usage in 2018.

Army to Modernize Tracking System for Cyber Attacks

US Army Cyber CommandThe U.S. Army is preparing to modernize Blue Force Tracking, its friendly forces tracking system, to ensure continued operability in the event of cyber and electronic warfare attacks.

The Army Wants to be Able to Track Friendly Forces During a Cyber Attack
C4ISRNET | By Daniel Cebul

Washington — The U.S. Army is preparing to modernize its friendly forces tracking system so that it will continue to operate through cyber and electronic warfare attacks.

The service’s situational awareness network, known as Blue Force Tracking, already receives periodic updates, but a more significant upgrade is needed if troops are to be adequately equipped for future warfare. “This capability improvement is necessary as the United States faces increased cyber and electronic warfare threats from near-peer adversaries,” Lt. Col. Shane Sims said in an Army press release.

Defense News reported in November 2017 that Russia’s Zapad exercise took place in a largely EW-hostile environment. Because Russia proved it can jam its own forces relatively easily, military officials are concerned about how well NATO forces are prepared to operate in GPS- and communication-denied environments.

To address these issues, the program office partnered with the Army’s Communications Electronic-Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC, and ran concurrent studies that examined the capabilities and limitations of current blue force tracking technology.

The work included:

A traffic study that explored how the current blue force tracking system generates and receives data, as well as the requirements of moving data digitally to identify any network vulnerabilities.

A cyber and electronic warfare study that aimed to identify what emerging technologies need to be developed to stay ahead of adversaries. The Army announcement notes, “assured positioning, navigation and timing, known as PNT, for soldiers in GPS-denied environments was the primary goal in this study.”

A network study that examined how to communicate future data more efficiently within the network.

A transport study that identified the physical infrastructure — radios, satellites and antennas — needed to move larger quantities of information. Part of the solution is to build in redundancies into the network to use different radios and different frequency bands.

This might entail deploying satellites of higher technological quality in larger quantities. A new satellite infrastructure that could handle more data and transmit information faster was credited with the improvements soldiers observed the last time the BFT system was upgraded in 2011.

“The goal of the next-generation BFTs is to reduce the cognitive burden on soldiers by creating a simply and intuitive network,” Sims said.

The Army issued a request for information on the system this month, and CERDEC is set to meet with Army leaders to discuss an acquisition strategy in February.

The Army hopes to issue a request for proposals from industry in early 2020, and could begin fielding the new BFT by 2025, the release said.

Strava Reviewing Features After Heat Map Exposes Military Locations

The App That Exposed the Location of Military Bases With a Heat Map is Reviewing Its Features
CNBC | By Ryan Browne

Strava, the fitness app that exposed the locations and activities of soldiers at U.S. military bases, is reviewing its features to prevent them from being compromised for malicious purposes.

The app, which calls itself a “social network for athletes,” lets users connect a GPS device to the service so that they can upload their workout logs online. This, in turn, revealed the movements of service personnel using the app and additional information about how frequently they were moving.

Strava Chief Executive James Quarles said that the company was “committed to working with military and government officials to address potentially sensitive data.” He added that Strava’s engineering and user experience teams were “simplifying” its privacy and safety features to inform users about how they can control their data.

“Many team members at Strava and in our community, including me, have family members in the armed forces,” Quarles said in an open letter Monday.

“Please know that we are taking this matter seriously and understand our responsibility related to the data you share with us.”

Quarles also emphasized that users could find existing details on how to manage their privacy on Strava’s website.

A U.S. military spokesperson told the Washington Post on Monday that it was revising its guidelines on the use of wireless devices on military facilities.